On 3 December 1810 the governor of NSW Lachlan Macquarie determined the location for Richmond’s future church, school-house and burial ground. In his diary he described the scene: ‘a very beautiful elevated bank immediately above this fine basin of fresh water’. When he returned on January 8 1811, the governor instructed the surveyor James Meehan to mark out this location with strong posts to define the boundaries. The name Richmond was painted on a board and nailed to a high post ‘immediately above and overlooking Pugh’s Lagoon…where it is intended to erect the church of Richmond’.

The church was not begun until about 1837, many years after Macquarie left the colony in 1821, however the school-house constructed in 1813 under the governor's orders served as a temporary place of worship until St Peter’s Church was completed. Designed by colonial architect Francis Clarke in the Colonial Georgian style and constructed by local builder James Atkinson at a cost of £1,697, the church was consecrated by Bishop Grant Broughton in 1841. Since that time several alterations to the exterior of the building have taken place, with the gable roofed porch being added in 1850 and the chancel in 1856. The attractive arched windows with blue and red coloured glass panes were added in 1874. Note the iron bootscrapers on either side of the porch steps. The bricks for the church would have been made locally by hand and vary in size and shape. Mechanisation of the brick making process was not introduced into NSW until the 1870s making the finished product much more uniform. The colour and texture was determined by the minerals present in the clay used to make the bricks.

The iron palisade front fence and memorial gates were commissioned to celebrate the jubilee of the consecration of the church in 1891 and were constructed by George Robertson of Windsor. The beautiful Onus window above the altar, presented in 1891 by Joseph Onus (1818-1895) was made by Sydney firm, Goodlet & Smith at a cost of £70. The two other stained glass windows were given by members of the Vindin and Stewart families. Set back from the road to the west of the church, the Rectory was designed by Edmund Blacket and completed in 1848. The design was reputedly similar to that of Bishop Broughton’s former vicarage in Farnham, England.

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Source Reference: 

6 September 1902 p 9

Source Notes: 

Article on the history of the church to date.

Images: 
Image: 
St Peter's Anglican Church Richmond
Caption: 
Entrance gates
Credits: 
Cathy McHardy September 2010
Image: 
St Peter's Anglican Church Richmond
Caption: 
View from Windsor Street Richmond
Credits: 
Cathy McHardy September 2010

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